betaal jou munisipale rekeninge€¦ · die rekening mag nie vir meer as 30 dae agterstallig wees...

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Tshwane UPDATE | Page 1 | OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2014 EDITION City of Tshwane intensifies its revenue collection drive New cheetah for Rietvlei Selby Bokaba Police 10111 Metro Police 012 358 7095 / 6 Emergency Services 10177 / 012 310 6300/6400 24-hour Call Centre 012 358 2111 / 080 111 1556 Water and sanitation, traffic lights, roads and storm water 012 358 2111 Customer care / credit control 012 358 9999 EMERGENCY NUMBERS T he City of Tshwane has always subscribed to constructive engagement with consumers, but when all avenues of discourse have been exhausted without the desired outcome, other approaches, which may be unpopular, have to be ad- opted. For the past 18 months or so the City has painstakingly engaged with various cus- tomers, imploring them to pay their collective and whopping R6,5 billion municipal debt accumulated over a period of time. When it became abundantly clear that these efforts were in vain, the City had no option but to take aggressive, drastic and unprecedented action and disconnect the electricity supply of any customer whose account was in arrears. This decision was made regardless of controversy and bouts of criticism that were likely to follow. The chorus of criticism reached a crescendo when the Municipality disconnected 53 of 140 schools, whose debt amounted to R21 million. As expected, the critics harped on the fact that learners were writing the year-end examination, but they ignored the fact that if Eskom had disconnected Tshwane for non-payment, those schools would still be without electricity. Fortunately, the Gauteng Department of Education (GDE) paid R11 million on be- half of the affected schools, who were then reconnected. A further R3 million was paid, bringing their total payment to date to R14 million. An arrangement to settle the balance of R7 million was also made, failing which the City will continue with disconnections. The GDE has set a good example by honouring its payment com- mitment. During the second week of November, an unprecedented 8 000 disconnec- tion notices were sent to customers who collectively owed the City R130 million. Madibeng Local Municipality in the North West Province, which owed a stagger- ing R48 million, was also briefly disconnected. After their disconnection, Madibeng made a hasty payment of R15,2 million before we reconnected them. They also promised to make monthly payments to settle their debt, failing which we will not hesitate to disconnect them again. Their outstanding balance is R33 million. The Moretele Local Municipality owes the City of Tshwane R56 million. However, their payment arrangement of a few years ago is being reviewed, as the payment period is too long and takes the form of a loan rather than clearing their debt. The City is delighted with the swift response of some government departments since its clarion call urging consumers to pay for their services. We received about R67 million in the past few days from the Department of Public Works and the De- partment of International Relations and Cooperation. The City has also increased its manpower on the ground by appointing 30 compa- nies to carry out disconnections and reconnections. Debt collectors will also fast- track legal action. Once you have made the required payment after being discon- nected, the City will reconnect you within four hours. This has been a painful exercise, but the City couldn’t allow itself to fall behind in service provision. We simply couldn’t administer the capital city of South Africa ef- ficiently and sustainably if consumers did not pay for their services. If consumers cannot settle their arrears, they should visit our municipal offices to make a payment arrangement. In terms of the Credit Control and Debt Collection Policy, at least 80% of the debt must be paid before a settlement agreement can be finalised. T he Rietvlei Nature Reserve has a new cheetah called Sanbona. Two-year-old Sanbona is a free-roaming young male cheetah and comes from the Sanbona Wildlife Reserve. Thank you, SA Hunters and Game Conservation Association, Pretoria East Branch for funding Rietvlei’s new cheetah and his tracking equipment.

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Page 1: Betaal jou munisipale rekeninge€¦ · Die rekening mag nie vir meer as 30 dae agterstallig wees nie. Afhangende van die bedrag wat agterstallig is, sal ’n deposito wat wissel

Tshwane UPDATE | Page 1 |

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2014 EDITION

City of Tshwane intensifies its revenue collection drive

New cheetah for Rietvlei

Selby Bokaba

Police

10111

Metro Police

012 358 7095 / 6

Emergency Services

10177 / 012 310 6300/6400

24-hour Call Centre

012 358 2111 / 080 111 1556

Water and sanitation, traffic lights, roads and

storm water

012 358 2111

Customer care / credit control

012 358 9999

EMERGENCY NUMBERS

The City of Tshwane has always subscribed to constructive engagement with consumers, but when all avenues of discourse have been exhausted without

the desired outcome, other approaches, which may be unpopular, have to be ad-opted.

For the past 18 months or so the City has painstakingly engaged with various cus-tomers, imploring them to pay their collective and whopping R6,5 billion municipal debt accumulated over a period of time.

When it became abundantly clear that these efforts were in vain, the City had no option but to take aggressive, drastic and unprecedented action and disconnect the electricity supply of any customer whose account was in arrears. This decision was made regardless of controversy and bouts of criticism that were likely to follow.

The chorus of criticism reached a crescendo when the Municipality disconnected 53 of 140 schools, whose debt amounted to R21 million. As expected, the critics harped on the fact that learners were writing the year-end examination, but they ignored the fact that if Eskom had disconnected Tshwane for non-payment, those schools would still be without electricity.

Fortunately, the Gauteng Department of Education (GDE) paid R11 million on be-half of the affected schools, who were then reconnected. A further R3 million was paid, bringing their total payment to date to R14 million. An arrangement to settle the balance of R7 million was also made, failing which the City will continue with disconnections. The GDE has set a good example by honouring its payment com-mitment.

During the second week of November, an unprecedented 8 000 disconnec-tion notices were sent to customers who collectively owed the City R130 million.

Madibeng Local Municipality in the North West Province, which owed a stagger-ing R48 million, was also briefly disconnected. After their disconnection, Madibeng made a hasty payment of R15,2 million before we reconnected them. They also promised to make monthly payments to settle their debt, failing which we will not hesitate to disconnect them again. Their outstanding balance is R33 million.

The Moretele Local Municipality owes the City of Tshwane R56 million. However, their payment arrangement of a few years ago is being reviewed, as the payment period is too long and takes the form of a loan rather than clearing their debt.

The City is delighted with the swift response of some government departments since its clarion call urging consumers to pay for their services. We received about R67 million in the past few days from the Department of Public Works and the De-partment of International Relations and Cooperation.

The City has also increased its manpower on the ground by appointing 30 compa-nies to carry out disconnections and reconnections. Debt collectors will also fast-track legal action. Once you have made the required payment after being discon-nected, the City will reconnect you within four hours.

This has been a painful exercise, but the City couldn’t allow itself to fall behind in service provision. We simply couldn’t administer the capital city of South Africa ef-ficiently and sustainably if consumers did not pay for their services.

If consumers cannot settle their arrears, they should visit our municipal offices to make a payment arrangement. In terms of the Credit Control and Debt Collection Policy, at least 80% of the debt must be paid before a settlement agreement can be finalised.

The Rietvlei Nature Reserve has a new cheetah called Sanbona. Two-year-old Sanbona is a free-roaming young male cheetah and comes from the Sanbona Wildlife Reserve. Thank you, SA Hunters and Game

Conservation Association, Pretoria East Branch for funding Rietvlei’s new cheetah and his tracking equipment.

Page 2: Betaal jou munisipale rekeninge€¦ · Die rekening mag nie vir meer as 30 dae agterstallig wees nie. Afhangende van die bedrag wat agterstallig is, sal ’n deposito wat wissel

| Page 2 | Tshwane UPDATE

Personeelverslaggewer

Staff reporter

Betaal jou munisipale rekeninge

Pay your municipal accounts

Die Stad Tshwane moedig inwoners aan om hulle munisipale rekeninge te betaal om volhoubare dienslewering te verseker.

Wanneer verbruikers 30 dae met hulle munisipale rekeninge agterstallig is, sal die Stad aanmanings en eise vir betaling uitreik. ’n Afsluitingskennisgewing (groen brief) word fisies by die perseeladres van die skuldenaar afgelewer, wat dan ’n tydperk van 14 dae het om die rekening op datum te bring.

Die Stad Tshwane is daartoe gemagtig om elektrisiteit af te sny en water te beperk wanneer

rekeninge agterstallig is.Elektrisiteitsafsnyding word veroorsaak deur versuim om te reageer op die afslui-tingskennisgewing van 14 dae wat uitgereik is. Die dienste aan die skuldenaar se perseel word afgesluit en ’n rooi brief word daar gelaat.

Indien die skuldenaar versuim om binne drie dae op die afsnyding van elektrisiteit te reageer, word water na die perseel beperk. By sakepersele word die water af-gesny.

In gevalle waar die skuldenaar slegs aan ’n watermeter verbind is, word die afsluit-ing uitgevoer onmiddellik ná die verstryking van die afsluitingskennisgewing van 14 dae. Wanneer die waterbeperking of -afsluiting plaasvind, word ’n blou brief uitgereik.

Die rekeninge van belastingbetalers wat nie hulle munisipale dienste betaal nie, word aan ’n invorderingsagentskap oorhandig. Die koste vir die volgende word ook op die rekening gehef: die koste van die finale aanmaning, R2,00 vir die SMS, asook R655 vir afsnyding van elektrisiteit of R551 vir waterbeperking.

Inwoners wat agterstallig is, moet reëlings met die munisipaliteit tref om hulle dienste te betaal. Die rekening mag nie vir meer as 30 dae agterstallig wees nie. Afhangende van die bedrag wat agterstallig is, sal ’n deposito wat wissel van 50% tot 80% met die kliënt onderhandel word voordat ’n reëling gefinaliseer word. Kliënte wat voorafbetaalde elektriesiteit gebruik moet ’n minimum van 80% betaal vir uitstel of as ’n deposito op ’n reëling, want hulle kan die elektrisiteitsverbruik op die meter monitor.

Ná die reëling ingevoer is, sal ’n heraansluiting deur die betrokke departement gereël word. Die heraansluiting sal nie langer as 48 aaneenlopende ure neem om geaktiveer te word nie, tensy onvoorsiene omstandighede plaasvind. Pogings word egter aangewend om die heraansluiting in minder as 48 uur te doen. Onder normale omstandighede sal geen koste op die heraansluiting gehef word nie.

Kredietbeheer- en kliëntedienstoonbanke word vanaf 07:45 tot 15:15 op Maandae tot Vrydae bedryf. Nauurse dienste is egter van 16:00 tot 19:00 beskikbaar. Dit stel werkende mense in staat om die toonbanke ná normale werksure te besoek. Die BKS-gebou is ook oop op Saterdae vanaf 07:45 tot 12:00 om soortgelyke dienste oor naweke te lewer, behalwe wanneer instandhouding aan die stelsel gedoen word.

Belastingbetalers moet nie hulle rekeninge by invorderingsagentskappe of indivi-duele amptenare van die Stad Tshwane betaal nie.

BetaalBetaal jou rekening voor of op die betaaldatum.Met ontvangs van die afsluitingskennisgewing van 14 dae, betaal die rekening(e) dadelik deur middel van eTshwane of besoek die naaste munisipale kantore vir ’n vereffeningsplan.

Voorafbetaalde elektrisiteitRekeninge vir voorafbetaalde elektrisiteit sal geblokkeer word wanneer die eien-dom 30 dae agterstallig is. Verbruikers kan nie weer elektriesiteit aankoop tot die verskuldigde bedrag betaal is nie.

Waar kan ek my rekening betaal?Munisipale dienste moet betaal word, ongeag of ’n rekening ontvang is of nie. Betalings kan gemaak word by die Stad Tshwane se kassierpunte, deur eTshwane of by geakkrediteerde betaalpunte van derde partye soos die pos-kantoor, Pick ’n Pay, Shoprite/Checkers, USave, OK, Spar, Boxer, Caltex, BP, EP-kioske, Investec, MTN, FNB, Absa, Nedbank of Standard Bank. Betalings kan ook deur middel van elektroniese fondsoordrag gemaak word.

The City of Tshwane urges residents to pay their municipal accounts to ensure sustainable service delivery.

When consumers are 30 days in arrears with their municipal accounts, the City will issue reminders and demands for payment. A disconnection notice (green letter) is physically delivered to the premise address of the debtor, who gets a 14-day period to bring the account up to date.

The City of Tshwane is authorised to cut off electricity or restrict water supply when accounts

are in arrears. Electricity disconnection is triggered by failure to respond to the 14-day disconnec-tion notice that was issued. The services at the debtor’s premises are disconnected and a red letter is left there.

Should the debtor fail to respond to the disconnection of electricity within three days, water to the premises is restricted. At business premises, water is discon-nected.

In instances where the debtor is only connected to the water meter, the disconnec-tion is carried out immediately on expiry of the 14-day disconnection notice. When the water restriction/disconnection takes place, a blue letter is issued.

The accounts of ratepayers who do not pay their municipal services are handed over to a collection agency. The account is also levied with charges for the letter of final demand, R2,00 for the SMS as well as R655 for electricity cut-off or R551 for water restriction.

Residents who are in arrears should make arrangements with the Municipality to pay their services. The account should not be in arrears for more than 30 days. Depending on the amount in arrears, a deposit ranging from 50% to 80% will be negotiated with the client before an arrangement is finalised. Clients using pre-

paid electricity should pay a minimum of 80% for deferral or as a deposit on an arrangement because they can monitor the electricity consumption on the meter.After the arrangement has been processed, a reconnection will be arranged by the relevant department. The reconnection will not take longer than 48 continu-ous hours to activate unless unforeseen circumstances occur. However, efforts are made to reconnect earlier than 48 hours. Under normal circumstances no charges are levied on the reconnection.

Credit Control and Customer Care counters operate from 07:45 to 15:15 from Mon-days to Fridays. However, after-hour services are available from 16:00 to 19:00. This enables people who are at work to visit counters after normal operating hours. The BKS Building is also open on Saturdays from 07:45 to 12:00 to render similar services over weekends, except when the system has to be maintained.

Ratepayers should not pay their accounts at collection agencies or to individual City of Tshwane officials.

PayPay your account on or before the due date. Upon receipt of the 14-day disconnection notice, immediately settle the account/s via eTshwane or visit the nearest municipal offices for a settlement plan.

Prepaid electricityAccounts for prepaid electricity will be blocked when the property is 30 days in ar-rears. Consumers are blocked from vending until the amount owing is settled.

Where can I pay my account?Municipal services must be paid for, whether an account has been received or not. Payments can be made at City of Tshwane cashier points, through eTshwane or at accredited third-party pay points such as the post office, Pick ’n Pay, Shoprite/Checkers, USave, OK, Spar, Boxer, Caltex, BP, EP kiosks, Investec, MTN, FNB, Absa, Nedbank or Standard Bank. Payments can also be made via electronic fund transfers.

Page 3: Betaal jou munisipale rekeninge€¦ · Die rekening mag nie vir meer as 30 dae agterstallig wees nie. Afhangende van die bedrag wat agterstallig is, sal ’n deposito wat wissel

Tshwane UPDATE | Page 3 |

Mmegi wa ditaba tša bašomedi

Lefa diakhaonto tša gago tša mmasepala

One place to receive and pay your accounts

Mmasepala wa Toropokgolo ya Tshwane o hlohleletša badudi go lefa diakhaonto tša bona tša mmasepala go netefatša gore kabo ya ditirelo ga e kgaotše.

Ge badirišaditirelo diakhaoto tša bona di šaletše morago ka matšatši a 30, Mmase-pala o tla romela mangwalo a go ba gopotša le go ba kgopela gore ba lefe. Tsebišo ya go kgaotša ditirelo (lengwalo le letala) le romelwa ka sebele atereseng yeo mo-koloti a dulago go yona, yena o fiwa matšatši a 14 a gore a lefe ka botlalo akhaonto yeo.

Mmasepala wa Toropokgolo ya Tshwane o dumeletšwe go ka kgaola mohlagase goba go

fokotša kabo ya meetse ge diakhaonto di kolota. Go kgaotšwa ga mohlagase go gakatšwa ke go se arabele tsebišo yeo e rometšwego ya go kgaotšwa ga mohlagase mo matšatšing a 14. Ditirelo tša mo dikagong tša mokoloti di a kgaotšwa gomme lengwalo le le hwibidu la tlogelwa fao.

Ge mokoloti a ka se arabele go kgaotšwa ga mohlagase mo matšatšing a mararo, meetse a mo dikagong tšeo a tlo fokotšwa. Mo dikagong tša kgwebo, meetse a tlo kgaotšwa.

Mo mabakeng a ge mokoloti a hlomeseleditšwe fela mitara wa meetse, meetse a kgaotšwa ka bjako ge tsebišo ya kgaotšo ya matšatši a 14 e felelwa ke nako. Ge go fokotšwa/kgaotšwa meetse, go fiwa lengwalo le letala.

Diakhaonto tša balefaditirelo bao ba se lefelego ditirelo tša bona tša mmasepala di fetišetšwa go bakgoboketši ba dikoloto (collection agency). Akhaonto yeo e tla lefišwa motšhelo bakeng sa lengwalo la kgopelo ya mafelelo, R2,00 ya SMS go-tee le R655 ya go kgaotšwa go mohlagase goba R551 bakeng sa go fokotšwa ga meetse.

Badudi bao diakhaonto tša bona di šaletšego morago ka tefo ba swanetše go dira dithulaganyo le Mmasepala tša go lefela ditirelo tša bona. Akhaonto ga ya swanela go šalela morago ka matšatši ao a fetago a 30. Go tla ya ka gore ke tšhelete ye kaakang yeo e kolotwago, gwa rerišanwa le modirelwa ka ga tšhelete ya peeletšo (deposit) ya go tloga go 50% go fihla go 80% pele thulaganyo e kwanelwa. Badi-relwa bao ba dirišago dimitara tša prepaid ba swanetše go lefa bonnyane bja 80% bakeng sa thulaganyo yeo goba bjalo ka peeletšo ya thulaganyo ka ge ba tla kgona go lekola tšhomišo ya mohlagase ya mo mitareng.

Ka morago ga tshepetšo ya thulaganyo, kgoro ya maleba e tla beakanyetša tlhomesetšoleswa. Tlhomesetšoleswa e ka se tšeye di-iri tše fetago tše 48 tša go latelana gore e tsošološwe ntle le ge ka gongwe go ka direga se sengwe seo se sa letelwago. Le ge go le bjalo, go sa dirwa maitekelo a go ka kgona go dira ditlhomesetšoleswa pele ga di-iri tše 48. Ka setlwaedi ga go motšhelo woo o lefšago ge go dirwa tlhomesetšoleswa.

Dikhaonthara tša Taolo ya Dikoloto le Tlhokomelo ya Bareki di šoma go tloga ka 07:45 go fihla 15:15 go thoma ka Mošupologo go fihla Labohlano. Le ge go le bjalo go nale ditirelo tšeo di fiwago ka morago ga dinako tša mošomo tša go tloga ka 16:00 go fihla 19:00. Se se kgontšha batho bao ba yago mešomong go ka etela dikhaonthara tšeo ka morago ga dinako tša mošomo tša setlwaedi. BKS Building le yona e a bulwa ka Mekibelo go tloga ka 07:45 go fihla 12:00 go fana ka ditirelo tše bjalo ka tšeo mo mafelelong a beke, ntle le ge e le gore sistemo e tla be e fiwa tlhokomelo.

Balefeladitirelo ga ba swanela go lefa diakhaonto tša bona go bakgoboketši ba dikoloto (collection agencies) goba go motho ka boyena yoo e lego moofisiri wa Toropokgolo ya Tshwane.

LefaLefa akhaonto ya gago pele ga letšatšikgwedi la yona goba ka letšatši leo. Ge o se no amogela tsebišo ya gore ditirelo di tlo kgaotšwa mo matšatšing a 14, ka bjako lefa akhaonto/diakhaonto ka botlalo ka go šomiša eTshwane goba o etele dikantoro tša mmasepala tša kgauswi go beakanyetša leano la go lefa akhaonto yeo.

Mohlagase wa PrepaidDiakhaontho tša mohlagase wa prepaid di tla thibelwa ge tefo ya thotong (prop-erty) e šaletše morago ka matšatši a 30. Badirišaditirelo ba tlo thibelwa go dira kgwebišano go fihlela sekoloto se lefša ka botlalo.

Naa nka lefa kae akhaonto yaka?Ditirelo tša mmasepala di swanetše go lefša, go sa šetšwe gore akhaonto e hu-manwe goba aowa. Ditefo di ka dirwa kua mafelong a dikhešiara a Toropokgolo ya Tshwane, ka eTshwane goba mafelong a šele ao a filwego toka a bjalo ka posokantoro, Pick ’n Pay, Shoprite/Checkers, USave, OK, Spar, Boxer, Caltex, BP, EP kiosks, Investec, MTN, FNB, Absa, Nedbank goba Standard Bank. Ditefo di ka dirwa le ka go romela tšhelete ka tsela ya selektroniki.

eTshwane is the preferred method of making a payment in a simple and secure way to the Municipality from the comfort and convenience of your home or office. Use our instructed debit pull or make payment directly from within Standard Bank Internet Banking using the MyBills option, Nedbank Internet or Mobile Banking using the MyeBills option.

Why should I pay using this service?

There are numerous benefits including:

You will receive an immediate confirmation of the payment instruction via the service followed by a proof of payment and payment receipt once the pay-ment has been confirmed successful by your bank.

This proof of payment is saved in your payment history and is available to you and the Municipality to view in the event of any payment related issues/

disputes.

Payments made via the service are reconciled and allocated against your account, eliminating any possibility of incorrect allocations or lost payments.

Payments made via other facilities can take up to 14 days to reflect on your municipal account whereas this delay is removed for payments made via the Tshwane service, eliminating the risk of unwanted actions by the Municipality.

The payment process:

Choose the bank account you wish to pay from and instruct the payment. Your account will be debited with the instructed amount and you will receive notification once the payment has been confirmed successful by your bank. Your payment is allocated to your account and will reflect on your next statement.

Page 4: Betaal jou munisipale rekeninge€¦ · Die rekening mag nie vir meer as 30 dae agterstallig wees nie. Afhangende van die bedrag wat agterstallig is, sal ’n deposito wat wissel

| Page 4 | Tshwane UPDATE

The City of Tshwane is entering a new chapter with the roll-out of smart meters to the first households in Tshwane. Households in the eastern parts of Tshwane

will be receiving their new smart meters during November.

Large power users were the first segment targeted in the new smart prepaid so-lution when roll-out started in 2013. Eventually all existing electricity meters in Tshwane are to be replaced with smart meters.

By implementing smart prepaid electricity throughout Tshwane, the Municipality will be able to overcome inaccurate billing and loss of revenue, and secure its fi-nancial position, as automated meter reading, data management, data processing and analysis will all be part of the new system. It will also create a more efficient electricity grid, which will benefit residents and businesses.

What is a smart meter?

A smart meter is an advanced digital electricity meter that records when and how much electricity is con-sumed, and deducts the amount consumed from a prepaid balance loaded by the consumer.

Smart meters allow consumers to view their near real-time electricity usage and over time help them to manage their consumption. The meter sends ac-curate reads automatically to the Municipality, which eliminates the need for electricity bills and manual meter readings. However, consumers will still receive an account for property rates and their other municipal services, namely water supply and waste collection.

Smart meters offer two-way communication between the meter and the Municipality. This enables the Mu-nicipality to read information off the meter, detect power outages and meter tampering, and send infor-mation to the meter including programming updates. Meters are tested in accordance with, and meet, In-ternational Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and South African specifications.

Managing electricity expenses

Residents will no longer receive unexpected high electricity bills, as smart meters send the meter readings automatically to the City of Tshwane’s back-end systems. Their consumption is then deducted from their prepaid credit on a real-time basis. They can view their credit and consumption on a website, the “Self Care Portal”. When they see how much electricity was consumed, they can adjust consumption habits and budget accordingly.

Other benefits:

█ Improved customer service, as queries about electricity billing will not be necessary any longer

█ Real-time outage detection, which helps the City to detect supply faults and proactively respond to them, allowing for faster resolution

█ Automatic upload of credit to the meter

█ More convenient purchase of electricity

█ Proactive SMS and email reminders when you are running out of credit and need to top up your account

█ No more estimated electricity bills, as you are able to manage your electricity expenditure in a simple and reliable manner

█ Less theft and fraud, as smart meters have anti-tampering technology and tamper alarms that are linked to the City of Tshwane’s system

█ Better planning by the City of Tshwane around the use of electricity, as load profiling is accurate, which can help to reduce unexpected power cuts

█ Access to details of your electricity consumption to the very minute you check, enabling you to adjust your consumption habits and save money

█ Installation of smart meters, which supports job creation, growth and development in Tshwane

█ Automatic meter reads sent to the back-end system, improving data accuracy and forecasting

█ No more physical meter reads

█ Meters operating on a prepaid system

█ No monthly electricity bills anymore, but a consumption analysis available online, resulting in fewer queries, disputes and complaints

█ City of Tshwane communication with the meters for software upgrades and tariff changes

█ Better usage data and therefore better energy service offerings

There are no costs involved for the consumer when the meters are installed. The meter is the property of the City of Tshwane and the full cost of the meters, installation and repair is carried by the City.

However, when residents switch over to the prepaid system, they need to have additional funds available to buy prepaid electricity so as to ensure enough credit in their smart meter account. At the same time they also need to settle their previous conventional meter account.

It is simple, it is smart, and it is prepaid

Tshwane breaks new ground with Wi-Fi TV

Invite the Tshwane Wi Fi journalists and your story and event will go viral.

The City of Tshwane is the first and only municipality to offer its residents free Wi-Fi TV.

With more than 250 active sites and capacity for over 1, 500 ,000 people at schools, community centres and parks, the free Wi-Fi network is the largest free public Wi-Fi network in Africa.

Users can tune in to the dedicated Tshwane Wi-Fi TV network, which offers hyper-local current affairs, sports, and lifestyle programming produced by young filmmak-ers from the community for their community. The content is available to view within the Tobetsa portal and is “zero rated”, which means it doesn’t use any of the viewers’ daily 250 mbs.

If you have a story for Tshwane Wi-Fi TV please email [email protected] We would love to hear from you and you too could appear on Wi-Fi TV.

Page 5: Betaal jou munisipale rekeninge€¦ · Die rekening mag nie vir meer as 30 dae agterstallig wees nie. Afhangende van die bedrag wat agterstallig is, sal ’n deposito wat wissel

Tshwane UPDATE | Page 5 |

City of Tshwane bus drivers have impeccable skill

In celebration of Transport Month, Tshwane Bus Services hosted a bus driver’s skills enhancement competition under the theme “Together moving Tshwane for-ward”. The aim was to improve the knowledge, skills and attitudes of professional heavy vehicle drivers, ultimately improve the standard of heavy vehicle driving and raise awareness of road safety.

The initiative involved all municipal departments that use heavy vehicles and was meant to reduce the number of road accidents and save the City of Tshwane mon-ey on unnecessary accident claims.

There were female and male driver categories; ten drivers participated. They had to do the following:

█ Road or economic test

█ Obstacle course

█ Pre-trip fault findings

█ Stop box

█ Swing gate (left and right)

█ Contact plate

█ Curve lane

█ Parking

Cllr Nozipho Tyobeka-Makeke said that this event is an important platform for rais-ing awareness of road safety and improving the driving skills of City of Tshwane bus drivers so as to benefit all commuters and motorists.

The MEC for Transport, Dr Ismail Vadi, congratulated the City of Tshwane for this initiative and said, “It is the first time I attend an event that deals with the training of bus drivers”. He then noted that if other transport companies did the same there would be a reduction in road accidents involving buses or heavy vehicles.

Come on, don’t be afraid; use the City of Tshwane buses. We are certain that you will be safe because the drivers have impeccable skill.

The winners of the driver skills training awards. In the male category, KN Aphane was the winner, FJ Mthobeni second and ME Mofya third. In the female category, NA Mahlangu was the winner, DH Mbethe second and M Zwane third.

TBS is serious about serviceKatlego Mampuru

New buses are easy to use, fast, safe, clean and affordable, and also boost development.

Public transport is often the only means of transport for the poor. It allows them to accept work opportunities beyond walking distance from their homes so as

to improve their livelihood. It also gives them greater access to education, health care and recreation. Public transport is also the main means of mobility for senior citizens, people with disabilities and children.

Tshwane Bus Services (TBS) has gone through difficult times in the past due to inefficient operating systems, an ageing fleet and insufficient control and monitor-ing mechanisms.

Buses that leave Tshwane commuters stranded due to delays or not showing up will soon be a thing of the past. As part of the City of Tshwane’s commitment to improving its public transport system, it has procured 120 new buses through a turnaround strategy to ensure that Tshwane commuters get a better and affordable public transport system.

Early in September, 44 of the 120 buses were delivered. The rest of the buses are expected by December 2014. To comply with the national transport department’s policy on universal access to public transport, 20 of the buses will be wheelchair friendly.

The new buses are on a full maintenance lease for a period of three years, after which ownership will be transferred to the City at no additional cost.

TBS is currently being transformed into a reliable public transport service. The City has started with disciplinary actions against the drivers suspected of ticket fraud and those who rendered the service unavailable to commuters in August through their strike action.

Communication with commuters will be improved by establishing commuter forums and by ensuring that staff members are better trained to assist commuters with queries.

The City will also increase its ticket purchasing points and will encourage commut-ers and schools to buy weekly and monthly tickets, as these are cheaper.

The installation of a fleet and fuel management system to track bus movement at any given time will be expedited so that services can be controlled and managed better. The City’s new buses will also be more user friendly to people with dis-abilities and drivers will be trained to be of better assistance to them. Commuters can also look forward to a smart phone application whereby they can plan their travel time with real-time bus locations once the user is logged in. It also shows the weather, fare prices, routes and timetables, and even gives tourism information.

Bus enquiries: 012 358 0839, 012 358 0840 and 012 358 0233

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| Page 6 | Tshwane UPDATE

Get out of your car and save the environment

Leswikana Metoane

The City has embarked on a big city transformation project where non-motorised transport facilities and infrastructure are being developed in various regions to

create a cycle and pedestrian-friendly environment.

In some of the regions cycle paths of at least 2,5 km were laid out. Atteridgeville, Mamelodi, Hammanskraal, Olievenhoutbosch and Winterveld are some of the areas that have cycle paths. From the 2007/08 to the 2013/14 finan-cial years, about 7 000 bicycles were distributed across Tshwane as a means of promoting cycling.

Walking is a major mode of moving around and the dominant mode in rural areas. About 23% of South Africans walk where they need to be and 76% of learners walk to their educational institutions.

The Department of Transport developed the National Transport Strategy to ad-dress the challenges faced by our rural and urban communities. The strategy is aimed at developing balanced and sustainable public transport systems by sup-porting local infrastructure and services. The department is also addressing mo-bility challenges facing learners in urban schools; the emphasis is on improving access roads, developing passable roads neglected infrastructure and corridors that are linked to markets and providing feeder systems to stations and other social services.The Department of Transport’s objective is to make walking and cy-cling for appropriate distances the preferred modes of transport in South

Africa, considering the fact that they are least expensive and most accessible. To enable and support walking and cycling, different government departments, NGOs and business leaders are building, expanding and maintaining continuous networks of formal walking (sidewalks, off-road paths, safe crossings, pedestrian bridges, etc) and dedicated cycle ways along the lines of high demand. The main objective of providing dedicated infrastructure is to protect walkers and cyclists from conflict with motorised modes, a leading cause of road traffic fatalities.

Did you know Road transport produces over a third of the carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide in our atmosphere and contribute

to over twenty percent of global warming. Cars and trucks produce the most air pollution during

vehicle operation and manufacturing. Car emissions can result in climate change, which is regarded

as one of the threats to sustainable development.

The City of Tshwane has once again demonstrated its commitment to work together with private sec-

tor and state-owned agencies to grow and develop Tshwane’s economy during the 2014 Automotive Week conference held at the Gallagher Con-vention Centre in Midrand in October.

The MMC for Economic Develop-ment, Cllr Subesh Pillay, joined automo-tive executives to encourage interna-tional investors to invest in the Tshwane Automotive City Project, a joint venture of the Gauteng Provincial Government and the City of Tshwane.

Pillay used the platform to position and pro-mote Tshwane as the automotive hub of South Africa to hundreds of potential domestic and foreign investors who attended the confer-ence.

“Tshwane has a well-established manufac-turing sector, with the automotive industry representing over 40% of national exports and employing almost 30 000 people,” said Pillay. He added that 40% of all passenger vehicles manufactured in South Africa are produced in Tshwane.

The City of Tshwane’s participation in activi-ties at the South African Automotive Week is in support of the City’s strategic objectives of promoting shared economic growth and cre-ating job opportunities. The automotive and components industry in Tshwane has a turn-over of about R30 billion in current prices. The industry generates about a quarter of the manufacturing sector’s value add, contributes about 3,3% to Tshwane’s economy and ac-counts for at least 35% of exported passenger vehicles.

To promote Tshwane as an ideal and ultimate investment destination in the automotive in-dustry, as well as to ensure focused engage-

ment with stakeholders, the City of Tshwane hosted a site tour during which potential investors visited Tshwane’s automotive companies, such as Ford,

BMW and Nissan, as well as the Automotive Supplier Park in Rosslyn.

About the Tshwane automotive city concept

The AIDC developed the Tshwane automotive city (TAC) concept in 2008 as a shared vision of government and the auto-motive industry so as to transform Tshwane into a leading investment destination. While the concept aims to assist the local automo-tive industry to become globally competitive, it also aims to boost Gauteng’s economy and sustainability.

The AIDC’s objective is to create a multibil-lion rand infrastructure development that will transform Rosslyn into an automotive city similar to Detroit in the US, VW in Wolfs-burg, Germany, and Toyota City in Japan. Tshwane has a rich automotive heritage spanning more than 50 years. Today, it is home to four original equipment manufac-turers, namely BMW, Nissan/Renault, Tata and Ford. The TAC concept will complement the existing supply and distribution infra-structure.

Using the TAC concept, the AIDC will:

• provide a complete range of automotive manufacturing clusters and a distribution supply chain in one location and therefore gain benefits from being close to each other;

• make South Africa the undisputed leader of the automotive industry in Africa, by building an automotive city rivalling the best in the world; and

• create thousands of jobs, grow the GDP of South Africa and develop

Tshwane, the automotive city

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Tshwane UPDATE | Page 7 |

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| Page 8 | Tshwane UPDATE

Understanding your regionLeswikana Metoane

On 19 May 2011, the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality (City of Tshwane) was proclaimed as the largest metropolitan municipality in Africa

and Tshwane as the third largest city in the world after New York and Tokyo. This came after the incorporation of the former Metsweding District Municipality, including Dinokeng tsa Taemane (Cullinan) and Kungwini (Bronkhorstspruit).

The incorporation, which gave birth to the new City of Tshwane in May 2011 after the local government elections, was in line with the Gauteng Global City Region Strategy to reduce the number of municipalities in Gauteng by the year 2016. After the incorporation, Tshwane’s previous five regions were increased to seven.

The seven regions are responsible for performing specific core regional functions. Each region is unique and requires different actions and responses to meet specific challenges and exploit particular opportunities. Thus, regions have both adminis-trative and functional roles in monitoring day-to-day operations related to service delivery.Below is an overview of each region:

Region 1Region 1 is situated in the north-western part of Tshwane and com-prises three main zones: a southern zone (Akasia, Rosslyn and Pretoria North), a northern zone (Klip-Kruisfontein, Ga-Rankuwa, Mabopane, Win-terveld and Soshanguve) and the rural zone in the west. There are 28 wards in Region 1.

Region 2Region 2 has three main zones: the urban northern zone, the central and eastern agriculture and conservation zones, and the southern zone. The region has 12 wards and houses Wonderboom Airport. It also includes a few prominent land uses of strategic significance locally and even internationally, namely the Onderstepoort Veterinary Research Institute, Zone of Choice, Dinokeng Big Five Reserve and Hammanskraal Railway Station.

Region 3Situated in the west of Tshwane, Region 3 is the administrative heart-land of government. It has 23 wards, including the central busi-ness district, Brooklyn, the Atteridgeville/Saulsville urban core and the Hatfield metropolitan node. Spreading from Elandsfontein in the west to East Lynne, Lynnwood and Waterkloof in the east, it is here that a number of national government departments and local government offices are located.

Region 4Region 4 with its 11 wards is situated in the south-western portion of Tshwane. The region includes a few prominent land uses of strategic significance, namely the Zwartkop and Waterkloof military airports, Thaba Tshwane/Voortrekkerhoogte Military Base, the Centurion metropolitan core, Centurion Gautrain station, Super-Sport Park, Highveld Technopark, Highway Business Park, Route 21 Corporate Park, Sunderland Ridge industrial area, N1 corridor, Samrand commercial area gateway development, Olievenhoutbos Absa housing development and Centurion Aviation Village.

Region 5Region 5 is a rural area characterised by nature conservation, tour-ism and mixed agricultural land uses. The region includes a few promi-nent land uses of strategic significance, namely the Cullinan Mine, Di-nokeng Big Five Nature Reserve and the Cullinan town centre. Areas such as Rayton, Cullinan, Refilwe, Kameeldrift, Derdepoort and Roodeplaat are part of this region.

Region 6Region 6 in the south-east of Tshwane incorporates Mamelodi, Faerie Glen and Garsfontein. The region contains a number of strategic land uses, including the CSIR, South African National Intelligence Service, Silverton, Waltloo, Willow Park, Koedoespoort industrial area and the Menlyn Park retail node with its metropolitan function in terms of facilities.

Region 7Region 7 has the second largest geographical land area of all seven regions and has four wards. The most eastern region of Tshwane, this area is the gateway between Gauteng and Mpumalanga and is part of the larger Maputo Corridor. The region includes a few prominent land uses of strategic significance, namely the Bronkhorstspruit town area, Ekandustria industrial area, Bronkhorstspruit Dam and high-potential agricultural land.

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Tshwane UPDATE | Page 9 |

How to register for the indigent programme

The City of Tshwane has embarked on an indigent registration drive in all re-gions in Tshwane. The first phase started in Region 2 in Soshanguve. The

Municipality plans to address the plight of poor residents by providing them with affordable basic services such as water and electricity.

The indigent programme is part of the Indigent Policy of the City of Tshwane, which is implemented in line with the national government’s call to alleviate pov-erty. The revised policy was approved by Council in June 2012 and provides guidance on the registration of households that are poor and unable to pay for municipal services.

The Health and Social Development Department continues to register indigent households during weekdays at all regional service points. Continuous outreach registration roadshows will also be held on weekends in all Tshwane regions, to assist eligible indigent households to register on the municipal database. Upon registration, indigent households qualify for access to basic municipal services such as water and electricity.

Who may apply for registration as an indigent household?

You may apply if you meet all of the following registration criteria:

█ Your total monthly household income, excluding child support grants and foster care grants, is not more than the joint pensions of two old-age state pensioners

█ Neither you nor any member of your household owns other fixed property than the property where you reside

█ You are 18 years or older, unless you are appointed to executorship by a court of law

█ You reside at the property for which you are applying, unless you are a legal guardian applying on behalf of a child- headed household

█ You are the registered owner of the property for which you are applying or a municipal tenant as defined in the Indigent Policy

█ You are an occupant of North West Housing Corporation or City of Tshwane property

█ You have a services account with the City of Tshwane

█ You are a South African citizen

What are the benefits of registering?

Registered indigent households qualify for 12 kℓ of free water per month, 100 kW of free electricity per month, free waste and sewage removal, as well as exemp-tion from rates and taxes.

What documents do you need to register?

Certified copies of the following documents should accompany your application:

█ Proof of income, or if you are unemployed, a sworn affidavit to that effect

█ Your identity document and those of your spouse and dependents

█ Electricity meter number

█ The birth certificates of your children and proof of their school attendance (a school report or a letter from the school)

█ Proof of your marital status (eg marriage certificate, divorce certificate, proof of customary union/living together or a death certificate, as applicable)

For more information please call:

012 358 4843/2332.

 

LOCATION AREAS COVERED 3rd Floor, Room 306 B, The Square Offices, Sammy Marks Square

All areas

Community Centre, Olievenhoutbosch Centurion

Atteridgeville Mini-Munitoria, Room E20 Pretoria West

Mamelodi Mini-Munitoria, Rooms C8 and C12 Pretoria East

Nellmapius Customer Care Office Pretoria East (Mamelodi, Nellmapius, Eersterust, East Lynne and Silverton)

Temba Municipal Offices, Room 115 Temba areas

Cenbis Offices, Hammanskraal Hammanskraal areas

Extension 2, next to Madiba Primary School Soshanguve South

Bodibeng Library, Block BB, Soshanguve Soshanguve North

Customer Care, Zone 5, Ga-Rankuwa Ga-Rankuwa

Council Chamber, Room 20, Akasia Akasia

Revenue Office, Block X, Mabopane Mabopane, Winterveld

Beirut Office, Mabopane Mabopane, Winterveld

Boekenhout Office, Block A (next to post office), Mabopane Mabopane, Winterveld

Zithobeni Multipurpose Community Centre, Municipal Building

Zithobeni Extensions 1, 2, 3 and 4, Bronkhorstspruit

Rethabiseng Community Library Extensions 1, 2, 3 and 4

Enkangala Transitional Local Council Sections B, C, D and RDP

Dark City Municipal Building Sections A, F, G, I and H

Refilwe Housing Office Refilwe, Rayton and Cullinan

WHERE TO REGISTER:

Metro Police assisting applicants during the first phase of the indigent registrationroadshow in Soshanguve.

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| Page 10 | Tshwane UPDATE

Jacarandas not so alien anymore

We once again experienced a beautiful Octo-ber with our streets shrouded by a canopy of

jacaranda blooms. For lovers of Tshwane’s most beautiful phenomenon of purple there is reason to celebrate. The Department of Environmental Af-fairs (DEA) has amended its regulations on alien and invasive species, which allows jacarandas back in urban areas.

In terms of the National Environmental Manage-ment: Biodiversity Act, the DEA has accommo-dated public sentiment by not listing the species in urban areas. “In these urban areas, there will be no control required for the species. It will be as if we are treating urban areas as plantations, and the trees can continue to be grown as street trees and ornamental garden trees,” said Minister Edna Molewa.Large specimens are also allowed within 50 m of farm homesteads.

Cable theft and vandalism

Go utswiwa ga dikheipole le tshenyo ya thoto

Cable theft remains a huge challenge for the City of Tshwane and the country at large. In recent months, the City faced the scourge of cable theft. This

impacts the City’s revenue, disrupts social services and plunges neighbour-hoods into darkness for lengthy periods of time. The cost is immense.

These acts not only impact power supply, but also erode the City’s financial resources which are needed to improve service delivery and rejuvenate the net-work. Instead the City now has to replace existing equipment that worked well.

Millions of rands are lost annually due to illegal electricity connections and cable theft. It has an effect on mini substations, cabling and transformers, among others, with a cost of R20 million between April and June 2014.

The City of Tshwane calls for the vigilance of residents, the business community and law enforcement agencies to help the City stem the tide of cable theft and illegal electricity connections – government cannot win the battle alone.

Report suspicious activity in your neighbourhood to the Tshwane Metro Police Department on 012 358 7095/6 or PRIMEDIA Crime Line: SMS 32211 (costs are R1/SMS; SMSs remain anonymous) and Eskom Crime Reporting Line: 0800 11 27 22 (toll-free and highly confidential).

The City urges residents not to tamper with any electrical infrastructure and equipment since there is a risk of electrocutions which may result in death or an indirect impact on consumers.

Go utswiwa ga dikheipole e santše e le tlhotlo e kgolo go Toropokgolo ya Tsh-wane le nageng ka bophara. Mo dikgweding tše fetilego, Toropokgolo e ile ya lebagana le pharela ya bohodu bja dikheipole. Se se nale khuetšo ka matlotlong a Toropokgolo, se šitiša ditirelo tša leago le go dira gore mafelo a kgauswi a aparelwe ke leswiswi sebaka se se telele. Ditshenyegelo tša se ke tše kgolo ka maatla. Ditiro tše bjalo ga di ame fela kabo ya mohlagase empa di gobatša me-thopo ya ditšhelete tša Toropokgolo yeo e nyakegago go ka kaonafatša kabo ya ditirelo le go bušetša sekeng dinetweke (networks). Legatong la se Toropokgolo e tlamega go humana didirišwa tše dingwe bakeng sa tšeo di lego gona tšeo di bego di šoma gabotse.

Dimilione tša diranta di a loba ngwaga ka ngwaga ka baka la ditlhomesetšo tše sego molaong tša mohlagase le bohodu bja dikheipole. Se se na le ditlamora-go tše mpe go diteišenenyana, go lokelwa ga dikheipole le difetošamohlagase (transformers), gare ga tše dingwe, ka ditshenyegelo tša dimillione tša diranta tše 20 magareng ga kgwedi ya Aporele le ya Juni 2014. Toropokgolo ya Tshwane e dira boipiletšo bja go ntšha mahlo dinameng go badudi, borakgwebo, diatšensi tša phethagatšo ya molao go thuša Toropokgolo go fediša pharela ya bohodu bja dikheipole le ditlhomesetšo tše sego molaong tša mohlagase. Mmušo o le noši o ka se fenye ntwa ye.

Bega ditiro tša go belaetša tša kgauswi le gageno go Kgoro ya Sephodisa sa Mmasepala ya Tshwane mo go 012 358 7095/6 goba Motatong wa Bomenetša wa PRIMEDIA ka go romela SMS go 32211 (ditefišo tša gona ke R1 ka SMS; di-SMS di tla dula e le tša hlokaina) le Motatong wa Eskom wa Pego ya Bosenyi: 0800 11 27 22 (ke nomoro ya mahala ebile ke ya bosephiri bjo tseneletšego).

Toropokgolo e kgopela badudi gore ba se fenyekolle didirišwa le infrastraktšha efe goba efe ya mohlagase ka ge go na le kotsi ya go tšhungwa ke mohlagase ye amanago le bohodu bja dikheipole yeo pheletšo ya yona e ka išago lehung goba ya ba le ditlamorago tše mpe tše sa lebantšhwago bareking.

Patronella MolaengSeala Charles Masewawatla

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Tshwane UPDATE | Page 11 |

Don’t wait – vaccinate your childKgomotso Ratsounyane

Worldwide, children and adults are protected against preventable diseases by means of immunisation with vaccines. Immunisation shields children and/or adults against harmful diseases before they come into contact with viruses which eventually lead to illnesses. It is the most cost-effective public health intervention and uses the body’s natural defence mechanism – the immune response – to build resistance to specific infections.

It is extremely important for children to have routine and/or follow-up immuni-sations, as one or two doses are not effective. Immunisation strengthens the child’s immune system to help fight off germs that may cause diseases like polio, measles, hepatitis B, diphtheria, tuberculosis (TB) and meningitis.

Vaccination is required by law for all children. Newborn babies and children up to the age of 12 need to be immunised. Children older than 12 years and younger than 15 years can still get the shot, unless they are exempted. Immunisation saves lives.

Tshwane residents are urged to take children to the nearest clinics and recom-mended immunisation sites known to clinics for vacci-nation.

The health staff will –

█ immunise the child according to his or her age;█ administer vitamin A; and

█ supply you with return dates for the next immunisation.

Important supplements given with immunisation include –

█ vitamin A (improves vision, aids speedy recovery from illness and reduces complications related to childhood diseases); and

█ deworming (kills intestinal worms).

Facts about immunisation

Immunisation –

█ saves lives;█ prevents the spread of diseases;█ is safe;█ saves money; and█ offers effective protection.

Each child is immunised at –

█ birth;█ 6, 10 and 14 weeks;█ 9 and 18 months; and█ 6 and 12 years.

In addition, each child needs to receive the following:

█ Vitamin A at 6 months, then every 6 months up to 5 years█ Mebendazole syrup at 1 year, then every 6 months up to 5 years

Parents are expected to ensure their children are immunised. A detailed record of immunisation may be requested when applying for school registration and social grants.

Preventable diseases

█ Tuberculosis: The BCG vaccine is given at birth or before 1 year of age to protect children against TB infections, mainly TB meningitis and miliary TB.

█ Pertussis (whooping cough) starts with a headache, fever and cough – the cough has a distinctive pattern of very long fits ending in a whoop. The strenuous coughing makes it hard for a child to eat and drink, or even breathe.

█ Hepatitis B is an infection of the liver that can be passed from an infected mother to her newborn baby during childbirth. It can cause liver damage, liver cancer and death.

█ Pneumococcal infection is caused by streptococcus pneumoniae, and is also known as pneumococcus. It can cause meningitis, infection of the lungs, blood infection, as well as infection of the middle ear.

█ Measles is a highly infectious disease that causes high fever, a fine red rash, and cold or flu-like symptoms (cough, runny nose and watery red eyes). Measles can have the following complications:

o Infection of the lungs

o Infection of the middle ear (which may cause deafness)

o Ulceration of the eyes (which may cause blindness)

o Malnutrition

o Brain damage

o Death

█ Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) can cause meningitis, infection of the lungs, infection of the joints, skin and blood, brain damage and death. It is most serious in infants younger than 1 year.

█ Diphtheria is a dangerous bacterial disease caused by a membrane that forms at the back of the nose and throat and obstructs breathing. It is spread through coughing or sneezing by an infected person.

█ Rotavirus is one of the most common causes of deadly diarrhoea and vomiting in children. The main symptom is watery diarrhoea, which may persist for five to seven days.

█ Tetanus (lockjaw) occurs when a germ from the soil enters a cut or wound. The germ can cause muscle spasms, breathing and heart problems, and death. The chances of dying from this condition are very high.

How to stay safe around water:• Learn how to swim.

• Keep your cell phone or cordless phone near the pool so you can call 10177 in an emergency.

• If you leave a pool even for a moment, take the children with you.

• A swimming pool fence is not a substitute for supervision. You still have to be on the lookout when children are around.

• Display a safety chart on your pool fence.

• Keep toys away from the pool when they are not in use.

• Empty baths, basins, sinks and troughs immediately after use.

• Ensure that nappy buckets are closed.

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| Page 12 | Tshwane UPDATE

Editor: Dikeledi Phiri

News Editor: Antoinette Mostert

Sub-editor: Ina Stahmer

Layout: Belia O’Bree

Contact us: [email protected]

West Indies left-handed batsman, Brian Lara, celebrated the City’s of-ficial opening of the cricket oval in Hammanskraal by showing young

cricketers how to hit those sixes.The City of Tshwane has begun to reposition the capital city as a sporting destination and is proud to finally claim and raise its fair stake in sport, which happens to be a multimillion rand industry and potential tool for develop-ment.The MMC for Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture, Cllr Nozipho Tyobeka-Makeke, said the opening of the cricket oval is a great milestone and must be commended. It is part of the bigger picture of delivering a multi-sport complex to meet the social, sporting and recreational needs of the Ham-manskraal community.According to Cllr Tyobeka-Makeke, we are on the right path to establish Tshwane as a sporting Mecca. Our youth now has the opportunity to practise and play cricket, soccer, softball, hockey, tennis and other sporting codes at one facility.The provision of this state-of-the-art facility will yield positive results for the community and the city in general, because it is more than a practice venue for budding sports stars. What was once deemed an elitist sport is now ac-cessible to the whole Hammanskraal community.

Green Ride promotes cycling as family fun

No one better to show you how to do it than Brian Lara.

The future Proteas in action on what they were coached.

Benedict Moale

New cricket oval opened in Hammanskraal

Cycling is increasingly being considered as a popular form of physical ac-tivity and social interaction. To promote low-carbon interventions, healthy

lifestyles and non-motorised transport in communities the City has decided to venture into the cycling world by launching its own cycling event with the help of Tshwane’s cycling fraternity. The 31 km maiden Green Ride was a huge winner with cyclists on the day. Various cycle clubs and cycling enthusiasts en-joyed an early ride through Tshwane’s purple-clad streets at the end of October. Cllr Dorothy Mabiletsa, Cllr Petunia Mashaba and Cllr NoziphoTyobeka-Makeke, all MMCs, and the Chief Whip, Cllr Jabulane Mabona, the acting Executive May-or, Cllr Terence Mashigo, and Gauteng MEC for Roads and Transport, Dr Ismail Vadi, also participated in this fun ride. The overall winners were the Maniyak Club. The Tshwane Urban Riders came second and the Pheli Cycling Club third.

The City of Tshwane plans to have such events annually to promote clean and healthy living while facilitating social cohesion. Cycling is also promoted as a means of non-motorised transport in Tshwane. To make this a reality, the City has already started investing in and rolling out cycling infrastructure in the form of bicycle lanes so as to realise Tshwane Vision 2055, which aims to build a resilient, resource-efficient and low-carbon city.

Partners and sponsors who supported and contributed to the event are the following:

• National Department of Transport

• Tshwane Urban Riders• South African Cities Network• Critical Mass Pretoria• Think Bike• Virgin Active• Road Accident Fund (RAF)• Cycology• Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)• A Re Yeng• HM Pitje Foundation• Maniyak Cycling Shop• PETCO